Media Gallery


Elephant Book Cover Time-Lapse Drawing

Watch as a baby African elephant comes to life for the book cover of HOW TO BE AN ELEPHANT: GROWING UP IN THE AFRICAN WILD—my second picture book with Roaring Brook Press/David Macaulay Studio.

The final art was drawn with pencil and completed in watercolor, ink, and gouache.

This time-lapse video was shot in my studio with an iPhone 3G using iTimeLapse, and the sound of the elephants grazing were captured on my Canon EOS 60D DSLR camera while out in the field with the Save The Elephants team in Samburu during my book research trip in May 2014. A very special thanks to David Daballen, who conjured my breathtaking introduction to African elephants on my first full day in the field.

 


Spiked Lunch: Behind the Scenes of HOW TO BE AN ELEPHANT

If you are what you eat, elephants are basically one big walking pile of acacia leaves. They eat other plants too, of course—some populations of elephants have hundreds of different greens to choose from—but the elephants that I met in Kenya loved acacia plants, enormous spikes and all.

In this classroom-ready video I share a little about acacia plants and the sharp weapons they have on their branches. Can you think of other adaptations that plants have for self-defense?

This video was filmed at the Sheldrick Ithumba Camp in Tsavo National Park, Kenya, in May 2014.

 


Swiss Army Nose: Behind the Scenes of HOW TO BE AN ELEPHANT

A hand and an arm and a nose and a shower—an elephant’s trunk is like a Swiss Army knife of tools! With over 100,000 muscles crisscrossing its length, this appendage is a masterpiece of strength and dexterity. 

In this classroom-ready video I share a few moments with a young elephant as she makes the most of her morning meal. Can you think of other functions that an elephant nose is well-adapted for?

This video was filmed at the Sheldrick Ithumba Camp in Tsavo National Park, Kenya, in May 2014.

 


Elephant Bluff Charge  |  Research Footage

I filmed this video during the research for HOW TO BE AN ELEPHANT while out in the field at the Mpala Research Centre with elephant expert Sandy Oduor. We had just spent the morning identifying elephants on the grounds when we came upon this migratory herd of 30-40 individuals, previously unseen at Mpala. Unlike resident herds, these elephants didn’t recognize Sandy, and when we stopped to give them space an older female bluff-charged our vehicle (as this video shows). Watch the “Elephants Trumpeting” video below to see how the herd reacted to our departure just a few minutes later.

This video was filmed at the Mpala Research Centre, Laikipia District, Kenya in May 2014. Special thanks to Sandy Oduor for getting us out of there swiftly and safely.

 

 


Elephants Trumpeting  |  Research Footage

I filmed this video during the research for HOW TO BE AN ELEPHANT while out in the field at the Mpala Research Centre with elephant expert Sandy Oduor. After identifying familiar area elephants we came this migratory herd previously unseen at Mpala, and when we stopped to give them space an older female bluff-charged our vehicle (as the “Elephant Bluff Charge” video above shows). As we continued forward to avoid becoming surrounded, other herd members crossed the road in front of us (as this video shows). It was an extremely dangerous situation, more than I fully understood at the time. Book research is not for the faint of heart!

This video was filmed at the Mpala Research Centre, Laikipia District, Kenya in May 2014. Special thanks to Sandy Oduor for getting us out of there swiftly and safely.

 


Shark Attacks Seal Time-Lapse Drawing

Watch as a great white shark comes to life in my debut picture book, NEIGHBORHOOD SHARKS. Set to the tune of the shark-filled waters of the Farallones, this drawing is not for the faint of heart!

The final art was drawn with pencil and completed in watercolor, ink, and gouache.

This time-lapse video was shot in my studio with an iPhone 3G using iTimeLapse, and the audio was captured with a Tascam DR-05 digital recorder while I was on Mirounga Bay at the Farallon Islands and on Tomales Bay near Point Reyes during my shark research trip in October 2012. Special thanks to Ron Elliott, Scot Anderson, Paul Kanive, and the crew of the Derek M. Baylis.

 


Farallon Islands Time-Lapse Drawing

Soar high over California’s Farallon Islands in this time-lapse video for my debut picture book, NEIGHBORHOOD SHARKS. Set to the tune of the shark-filled waters of the Farallones, this drawing is the last spread in the book.

The final art was drawn with pencil and completed in watercolor, ink, and gouache.

This time-lapse video was shot in my studio with an iPhone 3G using iTimeLapse, and the audio was captured with a Tascam DR-05 digital recorder while I was on Mirounga Bay at the Farallon Islands during my shark research trip in October 2012. Special thanks to the amazing Farallon shark team and the crew of the Derek M. Baylis.